Collingwood & The Blue Mountains Legends & Myths | Collingwood Real Estate | Blue Mountains

Beild House, Collingwood

Beild House CollingwoodThe Beild House at Pine and Third has ghostly tales of a doctor, Dr. J.R. Arthur, who once lived and practiced in the building. Beild House was the subject of a reality show, Cold Spot Paranormal Research – see their investigative report here.

Over the years, guests who have stayed at Beild House have reportedly seen people in the hallway, and a woman coming down the stairs, bleeding from the head. “Head wound lady” has been linked to an incident suffered by the wife of the doctor. Dean Hollin

 

“The Sisters” Memorial Park Beach

sisters-rockJust offshore at Memorial Park Beach, Meaford are two large rocks jutting out from the waters of Georgian Bay. Local legend has it that two sisters were swimming in the bay and swam too far from shore. They got into trouble and both drowned. Afterward, these rocks mysteriously appeared in the bay where the unlucky girls drowned. Since that time these rocks have been referred to as “the Sisters”.

 

 

“Blue Eyes” – The Ghost of the Meaford Tank Range

Blue Eyes Legend of Meaford Tank RangeLegend has it that in 1874 a little girl was picking flowers near her home just outside Meaford. Her mother called her for dinner and she came running and tripped and fell into an abandoned, boarded up well. The girl called for help but was not discovered until it was too late. The Meaford Tank Range is now located on the site. Today soldiers often report ghostly encounters with the little girl they call “Blue Eyes”. There are several versions of the “blue eyes” legend, and often when odd things happen the ghost of “Blue Eyes” is to blame by some of the army personnel training there.  It has been reported over the years that late at night they may hear a girl’s voice cry for help or occasionally see her wandering in the woods.

The Ghostly Captain Tripp

Cove Island LighthouseAlthough the setting of this this story takes place at Cove Island, near Tobermory, it does involve a Collingwood sailor, Captain Amos Tripp. On October 22, 1881, his schooner, the Regina was caught in a storm and while making its way through the light off Cove Island, sank just offshore. All hands except the Captain escaped. Although Captain Tripp’s body was later discovered and returned for burial in Collingwood, legend has it he refused to leave Cove Island. For years new lighthouse keepers and assistants would be introduced to the ghost of Captain Tripp. It was said the Captain liked to keep busy trimming wicks and polishing windows as well as sitting on the occasional hand of cards.